Quantcast
atla.doereport.comatla.doereport.comTransient Ischemic Attack (TIA)
Transient Ischemic Attack (TIA)



or
Search Language
Browse
Medical Illustrations
Medical Exhibits
Medical Animations
Medical Animation Titles
Medical Encyclopedia
Custom Interactive
Most Recent Uploads
Body Systems/Regions
Anatomy & Physiology
Cells & Tissues
Abdomen
Back and Spine
Foot and Ankle
Hand and Wrist
Head and Neck
Hip
Knee
Shoulder
Thorax
Medical Specialties
Anesthesiology
Cancer
Cardiology
Dentistry
Emergency Medicine
Gastroenterology
Infectious Diseases
Neurology/Neurosurgery
Nursing Home
Ob/Gyn
Orthopedics
Pathology
Pediatrics
Personal Injury
Plastic Surgery
Psychiatry
Radiology
Surgery
Urology/Nephrology
Account
Administrator Login
 
8/14/20
AAJ - Medical Demonstrative Evidence Medical Reference Library
Print this article
Transient Ischemic Attack (TIA)

Transient Ischemic Attack (TIA) Loading image. Please wait...

What is a Transient Ischemic Attack?
A transient ischemic attack (TIA) is a transient stroke that lasts only a few minutes. It occurs when the blood supply to part of the brain is briefly interrupted. TIA symptoms, which usually occur suddenly, are similar to those of stroke but do not last as long. Most symptoms of a TIA disappear within an hour, although they may persist for up to 24 hours. Symptoms can include: numbness or weakness in the face, arm, or leg, especially on one side of the body; confusion or difficulty in talking or understanding speech; trouble seeing in one or both eyes; and difficulty with walking, dizziness, or loss of balance and coordination. Loading image. Please wait...

Is there any treatment?
Because there is no way to tell whether symptoms are from a TIA or an acute stroke, patients should assume that all stroke-like symptoms signal an emergency and should not wait to see if they go away. A prompt evaluation (within 60 minutes) is necessary to identify the cause of the TIA and determine appropriate therapy. Depending on a patientis medical history and the results of a medical examination, the doctor may recommend drug therapy or surgery to reduce the risk of stroke in people who have had a TIA. The use of antiplatelet agents, particularly aspirin, is a standard treatment for patients at risk for stroke. People with atrial fibrillation (irregular beating of the heart) may be prescribed anticoagulants.

What is the prognosis?
TIAs are often warning signs that a person is at risk for a more serious and debilitating stroke. About one-third of those who have a TIA will have an acute stroke some time in the future. Many strokes can be prevented by heeding the warning signs of TIAs and treating underlying risk factors. The most important treatable factors linked to TIAs and stroke are high blood pressure, cigarette smoking, heart disease, carotid artery disease, diabetes, and heavy use of alcohol. Medical help is available to reduce and eliminate these factors. Lifestyle changes such as eating a balanced diet, maintaining healthy weight, exercising, and enrolling in smoking and alcohol cessation programs can also reduce these factors.

Source: The National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke
Updated: February 11, 2002



Medical/Legal Disclaimer
Copyright © 2003 Nucleus Medical Art, Inc. All Rights Reserved.
Related Medical Demonstrative Evidence - click thumbnail to review.
Your Risk of Stroke
Your Risk of Stroke -
Medical Animation
Add to my lightbox
Find More Like This
Stroke
Stroke -
Medical Animation
Add to my lightbox
Find More Like This
Diabetes and Your Risk of Heart Disease
Diabetes and Your Risk of Heart Disease -
Medical Animation
Add to my lightbox
Find More Like This
Cardiovascular Conditions and Type 2 Diabetes
Cardiovascular Conditions and Type 2 Diabetes -
Medical Animation
Add to my lightbox
Find More Like This
Ischemic Stroke
Ischemic Stroke -
Medical Animation
Add to my lightbox
Find More Like This
Diabetes, Complications and Symptoms
Diabetes, Complications and Symptoms -
Medical Illustration
Add to my lightbox
Find More Like This
Hemorrhagic Stroke
Hemorrhagic Stroke -
Medical Animation
Add to my lightbox
Find More Like This
Blood Test for Cholesterol
Blood Test for Cholesterol -
Medical Animation
Add to my lightbox
Find More Like This
Hemorrhagic vs. Ischemic Stroke
Hemorrhagic vs. Ischemic Stroke -
Medical Illustration
Add to my lightbox
Find More Like This
Hyperkalemia: Symptoms, Common Risk Factors, and Management
Hyperkalemia: Symptoms, Common Risk Factors, and Management -
Medical Animation
Add to my lightbox
Find More Like This
Hemorrhagic vs. Ischemic Stroke
Hemorrhagic vs. Ischemic Stroke -
Medical Illustration
Add to my lightbox
Find More Like This
Ischemic Stroke
Ischemic Stroke -
Medical Exhibit
Add to my lightbox
Find More Like This
How do I find a personal injury lawyer in my local area?
Find a personal injury lawyer in your local area using LEGALpointer™, a national directory of U.S. attorneys specializing in personal injury, medical malpractice, workers' compensation, medical product liability and other medical legal issues. Or, click on one of the following to see attorneys in your area: Alabama (AL), Alaska (AK), Arizona (AZ), Arkansas (AR), California (CA), Colorado (CO), Connecticut (CT), Delaware (DE), Washington D.C. (DC), Florida (FL), Georgia (GA), Hawaii (HI), Idaho (ID), Illinois (IL), Indiana (IN), Iowa (IA), Kansas (KS), Kentucky (KY), Louisiana (LA), Maine (ME), Maryland (MD), Massachussets (MA), Michigan (MI), (MN), Mississippi (MS), (MO), Montana (MT), North Carolina (NC), North Dakota (ND), Nebraska (NE), Nevada (NV), New Hampshire (NH), New Jersey (NJ), New Mexico (NM), New York (NY), Ohio (OH), Oklahoma (OK), Oregon (OR), Pennsylvania (PA), Puerto Rico (PR), Rhode Island (RI), South Carolina (SC), South Dakota (SD), Tennessee (TN), Texas (TX), Utah (UT), Virginia (VA), Virgin Islands (VI), Vermont (VT), Washington (WA), West Virginia (WV), Wisconsin (WI).
Medical Legal Blog |Find a Lawyer | Hospital Marketing