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Inguinal Hernia - Medical Animation



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5/31/20
Inguinal Hernia - Medical Animation
 
This animation may only be used in support of a single legal proceeding and for no other purpose. Read our License Agreement for details. To license this animation for other purposes, click here.

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Inguinal Hernia - Medical Animation
MEDICAL ANIMATION TRANSCRIPT:
An inguinal hernia is a condition where abdominal contents, such as the intestine, bulge through a weakness in an area of the groin called the inguinal canal. As the intestine pushes through this weakness, a hernia sac made from tissue lining the inside of the abdomen, called the peritoneum, surrounds it. The intestine may become trapped, or incarcerated, inside the hernia sac. Over time, its blood supply may be cut off-- leading to strangulation-- where the tissue inside the hernia sac dies. A totally extra peritoneal laparoscopic inguinal hernia repair requires only small keyhole incisions into the abdomen, known as ports. To reach the hernia, the surgeon will insert a tube, called a trocar, through a port located just below your navel, or umbilicus. This instrument will be used to separate the inner abdominal wall from the peritoneum. Then, a balloon surrounding the instrument will be inflated to create a space for the surgeon to work. Next, your surgeon will insert the laparoscope through the umbilical port. Images from its camera will be transmitted to a video monitor in the operating room. Once the working space is created, two additional trocars will be inserted. The surgeon will pass surgical instruments through them. These instruments will be used to separate attachments to the hernia sac, and gently pull it out of the inguinal canal and back into the abdomen. To prevent anything from slipping back through the opening, the surgeon will place a piece of mesh over it and tack it in place. The incisions will be closed with sutures, followed by skin glue, or skin closure tape. [? If ?] there are complications with your laparoscopic procedure, your surgeon will switch to an open procedure with a larger incision.

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"The Doe Report's Do-It-Yourself Exhibits program enables easy customization of complex medical exhibits at a reasonable expense and in a timely manner. Practically speaking, custom medical exhibits are no longer an unthinkable luxury, but a routine necessity."

Jack S. Cohen
Levy, Angstreich, Finney, Baldante & Coren
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"The Doe Report is a visual feast of medical information for personal injury lawyers."

Aaron R. Larson, Esq.
President
ExpertLaw.com

"It is my experience that it's much more effective to show a jury what happened than simply to tell a jury what happened. In this day and age where people are used to getting information visually, through television and other visual media, I would be at a disadvantage using only words.

I teach a Litigation Process class at the University of Baltimore Law Schooland use [Medical Legal Art's] animation in my class. Students always saythat they never really understood what happened to [to my client] until theysaw the animation.

Animations are powerful communication tools that should be used wheneverpossible to persuade juries."

Andrew G. Slutkin
Snyder Slutkin & Kopec
Baltimore, MD
"I just wanted to let you know that after several days on trial, I settled [my client's] construction accident case for $4.5 million. Immediately after the jury was discharged, I spoke with several jurors who told me that they really appreciated the medical illustrations for their clarity in dealing with [my client's] devastating injuries. They also expressed their gratitude in being able to read from a distance all of the notations without difficulty. Obviously, the boards were visually persuasive. I am certain that this contributed to our successful result."

Michael Gunzburg, Esq.
Attorney at Law.
New York, NY

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