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Type 1 Diabetes - Medical Animation



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10/1/20
Type 1 Diabetes - Medical Animation
 
This animation may only be used in support of a single legal proceeding and for no other purpose. Read our License Agreement for details. To license this animation for other purposes, click here.

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Type 1 Diabetes - Medical Animation
MEDICAL ANIMATION TRANSCRIPT:
Type I diabetes is a condition in which your pancreas does not produce insulin, a hormone your body needs to maintain proper blood sugar levels. After you eat foods that contain carbohydrates, chemicals in your small intestine break them down into single sugar molecules called glucose. Next, the cells lining your small intestine absorb the glucose, which passes into the bloodstream. When the blood reaches your pancreas, beta cells inside the pancreas detect the rising glucose levels. The beta cells release insulin into your bloodstream to reduce glucose levels and to keep your blood glucose in a healthy range. Most cells of the body have certain receptors on their surface that bind to the circulating insulin. Insulin acts like a key in a lock to open up the cell, so that the circulating glucose can get inside the cell. Now your cell can use the glucose to produce the energy it needs to function properly. If you have type I diabetes, your pancreatic beta cells lose their ability to produce insulin, resulting in high blood glucose levels and other complications. In type 1 diabetes, your immune system-- specifically your white blood cells-- mistake your pancreatic beta cells for foreign invaders. In an autoimmune response, your white blood cells secrete autoantibodies that destroy your own beta cells. As a result, your pancreas produces little or no insulin. Without insulin, glucose cannot get into your cells, so they are starved for the calories they should be receiving from glucose. In addition, the glucose level builds up in your bloodstream, resulting in a condition called hyperglycemia. Common symptoms of hyperglycemia in type 1 diabetes include excessive hunger, excessive thirst, frequent urination, unexplained weight loss, fatigue, weakness, irritability, and blurry vision. If hyperglycemia is not treated, you can become severely ill. Because you don't have enough insulin circulating in your blood, your cells can't use glucose for energy. As a result, your body breaks down your fat and protein stores as an alternative source of energy. As fat breakdown continues, certain byproducts-- known as ketone bodies-- accumulate in the blood, resulting in a condition called ketosis. , When ketones build up to dangerously high levels a life-threatening condition called diabetic ketoacidosis results. If your blood glucose remains high over time, long-term health problems can occur, such as atherosclerosis, blindness, nerve damage, and kidney disease. If you have type I diabetes, your goal is to keep your blood glucose within a normal range. This is done through a combination of proper insulin replacement, monitoring your blood glucose, and, just as importantly, eating a healthy diet and getting regular exercise. Because your pancreas no longer produces insulin, you will need to take insulin to replace what your body should be making. A licensed health care professional can train you to inject the insulin just under the skin. You will need to give yourself injections several times each day, and rotate injection sites to avoid tissue damage and absorption problems. Another way to get insulin is through an insulin pump, which is attached to your body and delivers insulin through a tube implanted just under your skin. You will need to check the level of glucose in your blood several times a day with a glucometer. To do this, you will prick your finger with a small needle called a lancet and place a drop of blood in the glucometer. Knowledge of your blood glucose level allows you to adjust your insulin dose, calories you eat during meals, and physical activity. You will need to eat a healthy diet, and get regular exercise, to manage your glucose level and reduce your risk of cardiovascular disease.

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What attorneys say about MLA and The Doe Report:
"I wanted to thank you for the terrific job you did illustrating my client's injuries. The case was settled at the pre-suit mediation, and I believe a good part of the success we had was due to the medical legal art you prepared.

Your work received the ultimate compliment at the conclusion of the mediation. The hospital risk manager took the exhibit with them at the conclusion of mediation, and will be using it to train nurses on how to prevent bed sores..."

Steven G. Koeppel
Troy, Yeslow & Koeppel, P.A.
Fort Myers, FL

"It is my experience that it's much more effective to show a jury what happened than simply to tell a jury what happened. In this day and age where people are used to getting information visually, through television and other visual media, I would be at a disadvantage using only words.

I teach a Litigation Process class at the University of Baltimore Law Schooland use [Medical Legal Art's] animation in my class. Students always saythat they never really understood what happened to [to my client] until theysaw the animation.

Animations are powerful communication tools that should be used wheneverpossible to persuade juries."

Andrew G. Slutkin
Snyder Slutkin & Kopec
Baltimore, MD
"Thank you very much for the great work on the medical exhibits. Our trial resulted in a $16 million verdict for a 9 year old boy with catastrophic injuries, and the medical illustrations definitely played key role in the trial."

David Cutt
Brayton Purcell
Salt Lake City, UT

"The illustrations have consistently been well documented, accurate and timely. Most important though is that the illustrations demonstrate to juries and claims people the persuasive power of visual communication. Our firm has achieved multiple eight figure settlements and verdicts over the past ten years... Medical Legal Art has been there with us on every case."

Thomas C. Jones
Davis, Bethune & Jones, L.L.C.
Kansas City, MO
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