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Pressure Sores - Medical Animation



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6/5/20
Pressure Sores - Medical Animation
 
This animation may only be used in support of a single legal proceeding and for no other purpose. Read our License Agreement for details. To license this animation for other purposes, click here.

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Pressure Sores - Medical Animation
MEDICAL ANIMATION TRANSCRIPT:
Pressure sores, also called bed sores, or decubitis ulcers, are regions of skin that break down when you sit or lie in one position for too long. These wounds occur most frequently in areas where your bones are close to the skin. Including your heels, ankles, hips, tailbone, or elbows. Constant pressure to one of these areas compresses the blood vessels that supply your skin with oxygen and vital nutrients. Without a sufficient amount of blood flow your skin cells eventually die. And a pressure sore forms. Pressure sores are categorized by degrees of severity. A stage one pressure sore is reddened, inflamed, and is not blanch, or become pale, when pressure is applied. A stage two pressure sore appears as a blister or an open sore. The area surrounding the sore may be red and irritated. A stage three pressure sore involves a full thickness loss of skin that appears crater like and extends to the layer of fat beneath your skin. Stage four is the most severe. A stage four ulcer is a full-thickness wound that extends down to the underlying muscle or bone. In 2007 the National Pressure Ulcer Advisory Panel added two more ulcer stages. Suspected deep tissue injury, and unstageable. Suspected deep tissue injury is a maroon or purple area of the skin and may contain a blister filled with blood. It looks like this because of damaged soft tissue underneath your skin. An unstageable ulcer is a full-thickness loss of tissue. However, the amount of tissue loss cannot be determined because the ulcer is covered by dead tissue. To prevent infection in your pressure sore your doctor will clean your wound using water and a mild soap or saline solution. If your would is severe your doctor will debride, or surgically remove, the dead tissue from the pressure sore. To protect and hydrate your wound your doctor may cover it with a specialized bandage.

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What attorneys say about MLA and The Doe Report:
"Thank you for the splendid medical-legal art work you did for us in the case of a young girl who was blinded by a bb pellet. As a result of your graphic illustrations of this tragic injury, we were able to persuade the insurance company to increase their initial offer of $75,000.00 to $475,000.00, just short of their policy limits.

We simply wanted you to know how pleased we were with your work which, to repeat, was of superlative character, and to let you know that we would be more than willing to serve as a reference in case you ever need one. Many thanks for an extraordinary and dramatic depiction of a very serious injury which clearly "catapulted" the insurance company's offer to a "full and fair" amount to settle this case."

Philip C. Coulter
Coulter &Coulter
Roanoke, VA

"At 3 PM it hit me--I needed exhibits of a tracheostomy, a coronary artery bypass and a deep vein thrombosis--all in time for a for-trial video deposition the next day. The Doe Report had each exhibit on line. In addition, I ran across an exhibit I hadn't even thought of: reduced ejection fraction after a heart attack. Because this was a video deposition, I could use the e-mail version of the medical exhibit, print it on my color copier, and let the camera zoom in. For $400, less than one blow-up by one of The Doe Report's competitors, I got four first-rate exhibits in less than a day. The Doe Report saved me time and money."

Tracy Kenyon Lischer
Pulley Watson King & Lischer
Durham, NC
www.PWKL.com

"This past year, your company prepared three medical illustrations for our cases; two in which we received six figure awards; one in which we received a substantial seven figure award. I believe in large part, the amounts obtained were due to the vivid illustrations of my clients' injuries and the impact on the finder of fact."

Donald W. Marcari
Marcari Russotto & Spencer, P.C.
Chesapeake, VA

"We got a defense verdict yesterday! Your exhibit was extremely helpful in showing the jury how unlikely it is to damage all four of the nerve branches which control the sense of taste."

Karen M. Talbot
Silverman Bernheim & Vogel, P.C.
Philadeplphia, PA

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