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Chemotherapy - Medical Animation



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12/2/20
Chemotherapy - Medical Animation
 
This animation may only be used in support of a single legal proceeding and for no other purpose. Read our License Agreement for details. To license this animation for other purposes, click here.

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Chemotherapy - Medical Animation
MEDICAL ANIMATION TRANSCRIPT: If you have cancer your doctor may recommend chemotherapy as part of your treatment. The cells in the body grow and divide as part of the normal cell cycle. The cell's nucleus controls this process. Inside each nucleus genetic material called DNA contains the instructions for directing this process. Sometimes the cell's DNA becomes damaged. Normally the DNA responds by either repairing itself or instructing the cell to die. In cancer, however, the parts of the cell's DNA that direct cell division become damaged. When these sections are damaged the DNA is unable to repair itself or cause the cell to die. Instead the unrepaired DNA causes the cell to grow and divide uncontrollably into more damaged cells called cancer cells. A tumor forms as the cancer cells multiply and displace the normal cells. As the tumor enlarges it develops its own blood supply. Since cancer cells do not stick together as well as normal cells, they may break away and enter a nearby blood vessel. Cancer cells in blood vessels may travel to other areas of your body and form additional tumors. This is called metastasis. Additional tumors may form in areas such as the lungs, liver, and bones. Another way cancer may spread to other areas of your body is through your lymphatic system. Cancer cells may enter lymph vessels near the tumor then travel to small glands called lymph nodes. If the cells pass through the nodes they may continue to travel through your lymphatic system and form additional tumors. Chemotherapy drugs work by targeting fast growing and reproducing cells, a characteristic common to cancer cells. The tumor shrinks as the cells stop dividing and die. Most chemotherapy drugs work systemically as they travel throughout your body in your bloodstream. As they circulate, the drugs damage metastatic cancer cells in other organs. Unfortunately chemotherapy drugs cannot tell the difference between fast growing normal cells and cancer cells. As a result these drugs also damage or irritate some of your fast growing normal cells, such as those in your bone marrow, digestive system, and hair follicles. Death irritation or damage to these normal cells produces side effects, such as a weakened immune system, nausea, and hair loss. The goal of chemotherapy is to reduce or eliminate cancer cells in the original tumor and any sites of metastasis. In addition to being a primary cancer treatment, doctors often use chemotherapy as a secondary treatment before, during, or after other primary cancer treatments such as radiation therapy or surgical excision of a tumor. Depending on the location and type of cancer, you may receive chemotherapy drugs intended to circulate throughout your body, including pills, capsules, or liquids taken orally and intravenous or intramuscular injections. Alternatively you may receive drugs delivered only to the area of the tumor. One local method delivers drugs to your bladder or chest through narrow tubes called catheters. Another local method injects drugs into the cerebral spinal fluid surrounding your brain and spinal cord. A third local method places slowly dissolving wafers into an area where a tumor was removed. In most cases you will receive a number of different chemotherapy drugs to increase their effectiveness. You may receive many chemotherapy treatments spread out over a period of weeks or months. This allows your body to recover between treatments and to kill as many cancer cells as possible. Common side effects of chemotherapy include hair loss, nausea, decreased appetite, fatigue, anemia, bruising, and diarrhea. It is important to rest, eat nutritious foods, and take medications prescribed by your doctor to reduce or minimize these side effects.

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What attorneys say about MLA and The Doe Report:
"Our practice involves medical negligence cases exclusively. We have six attorneys and one physician on staff. We have used Medical Legal Art's staff for every one of our cases over the past 12 years and have found their services to be extraordinary. The transformation of medical records into powerful graphic images has without fail been handled expertly, expeditiously and effectively translating into superb results for our clients, both in the courtroom and in settlement. Every case can benefit from their excellent work and we unqualifiedly recommend their services. They are the best!"

Chris Otorowski
Morrow and Otorowski
Bainbridge Island, Washington
www.medilaw.com

"Medical illustrations are essential during trial for any medical malpractice case. The people at MLA have the uncanny ability of creating medical illustrations that simplify the most complex of medical concepts and human anatomy to a lay audience. The exhibits of MLA allow experts to easily describe complex concepts and human anatomy in a manner that could not be done otherwise.

In addition, their custom illustrations show in great detail the extent of injuries suffered and the devastating effects they have had on the client's anatomy. These custom illustration can show, side by side, the body before and after a catastrophic injury. The effect of this juxtaposition is unmatched by any testimony that can be adduced at the time of trial.

Even jurors after trial have commented on the ease with which they grasp medical concepts and anatomy once the MLA exhibits were introduced and used by my experts. Even judges who have "seen it all" are thoroughly impressed by the detail and sophistication of the illustrations.

I would not want to try a case without them."

Lambros Y. Lambrou
McHUGH & LAMBROU, LLP
New York, NY

"I would like to thank all of you at Medical Legal Art for all the assistance you provided. It was a result of the excellent, timely work that we were able to conclude the case successfully.

I feel very confident that our paths will cross again."

Fritz G. Faerber
Faerber & Anderson, P.C.
St. Louis, MO

"It is my experience that it's much more effective to show a jury what happened than simply to tell a jury what happened. In this day and age where people are used to getting information visually, through television and other visual media, I would be at a disadvantage using only words.

I teach a Litigation Process class at the University of Baltimore Law Schooland use [Medical Legal Art's] animation in my class. Students always saythat they never really understood what happened to [to my client] until theysaw the animation.

Animations are powerful communication tools that should be used wheneverpossible to persuade juries."

Andrew G. Slutkin
Snyder Slutkin & Kopec
Baltimore, MD
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