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atla.doereport.comatla.doereport.comIntrauterine Device (IUD) - Medical Animation
Intrauterine Device (IUD) - Medical Animation



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7/7/20
Intrauterine Device (IUD) - Medical Animation
 
This animation may only be used in support of a single legal proceeding and for no other purpose. Read our License Agreement for details. To license this animation for other purposes, click here.

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Intrauterine Device (IUD) - Medical Animation
MEDICAL ANIMATION TRANSCRIPT: A series of events called the menstrual cycle happens about once every month to prepare a woman's body for pregnancy. Changing levels of natural chemicals in the bloodstream, called hormones, control these events. The reproductive organs affected by these hormones include, the vagina, cervix, uterus fallopian tubes, and ovaries. The ovaries produce two main hormones called estrogen and progesterone. As the level of estrogen begins to rise, it causes the normally thick mucus inside the cervix to thin out. Estrogen also triggers other hormones to cause one of the ovaries to release an egg. This process is called ovulation. If a woman has sex during this time. A man's reproductive cells, called sperm, can pass through the thinner mucus to fertilize an egg. In the uterus, estrogen causes the lining too thicken, which prepares it to receive a fertilized egg. Rising progesterone levels cause glands in the lining to release fluid that feeds the fertilized egg. Progesterone also causes the thinned out mucus in the cervix to become thick again, which prevents sperm from passing through. If an egg hasn't been fertilized, the levels of both estrogen and progesterone begin to fall. This drop in hormone levels causes menstruation, a process where the uterus sheds its inner tissue lining and blood through the vagina. An intrauterine device, or IUD, is a birth control method consisting of a soft, flexible t-shaped device with a thin string on the end. There are two types of intrauterine devices, hormonal IUDs and a copper IUD. To prevent pregnancy, a doctor places an IUD inside a woman's uterus with the string hanging down inside her vagina. Both types of IUD cause mild inflammation of the uterine lining, which releases immune cells and chemicals that kill sperm. Hormonal IUDs also contain a synthetic type of progesterone called Levonorgestrel. Levonorgestrel mainly prevents pregnancy by thickening the mucus inside the cervix, which prevents sperm from entering the uterus. It also prevents the uterine lining from thickening, so it is less likely to receive a fertilized egg. About a month after inserting an IUD, the doctor may schedule an exam to make sure it is still in place. The doctor may also teach the woman how to check her IUD between visits by feeling for the string inside the vagina. Depending on the type, an IUD can be left in place for 3 to 10 years. Women can have their doctor remove an IUD at any time for any reason, including the desire to have children. An intrauterine device, or IUD, is one of the most effective methods of birth control. IUD's are over 99% effective at preventing pregnancy. This means that less than one out of 100 women will become pregnant each year if they use an IUD and check it regularly for correct placement. However, IUDs are only about 97% effective if not checked for correct placement. For more information on any type of birth control, talk to your doctor.

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What attorneys say about MLA and The Doe Report:
"This past year, your company prepared three medical illustrations for our cases; two in which we received six figure awards; one in which we received a substantial seven figure award. I believe in large part, the amounts obtained were due to the vivid illustrations of my clients' injuries and the impact on the finder of fact."

Donald W. Marcari
Marcari Russotto & Spencer, P.C.
Chesapeake, VA
"Whether it's demonstrating a rotator cuff tear, neck movement a few milliseconds after rear impact, or a proposed lumbar fusion, the Doe Report represents an instant on-line database of medical illustration for health-care and legal professionals.

Illustrations can be purchased 'as is' or modified within hours and sent either electronically or mounted on posterboard. An illustration is worth a thousand words, as juries perk up and look intently to capture concepts that are otherwise too abstract. Start with good illustrations, a clear and direct voice, a view of the jury as 12 medical students on day one of training, and your expert testimony becomes a pleasure, even on cross examination. An experienced trial lawyer should also emphasize these illustrations at the end of trial, as a means of visually reinforcing key concepts covered.

As a treating physician, I also use these accurate illustrations to educate my own patients about their medical conditions. The Doe Report is an invaluable resource, and its authors at MLA have always been a pleasure to work with."

Richard E. Seroussi M.D., M.Sc.
Diplomate, American Boards of Electrodiagnostic Medicine and PM&R
Seattle Spine & Rehabilitation Medicine
www.seattlespine.info

"[Your staff] was extremely efficient, cooperative and gracious and [their] efforts produced a demonstrative exhibit that we used effectively throughout our trial. The jury verdict of $3,165,000.00 was, in no small measure, due to the impact of the demonstrative evidence. You may be sure that we will call again."

David J. Dean
Sullivan Papain Block McGrath & Cannavo, P.C.
New York, NY

"Thank you for the splendid medical-legal art work you did for us in the case of a young girl who was blinded by a bb pellet. As a result of your graphic illustrations of this tragic injury, we were able to persuade the insurance company to increase their initial offer of $75,000.00 to $475,000.00, just short of their policy limits.

We simply wanted you to know how pleased we were with your work which, to repeat, was of superlative character, and to let you know that we would be more than willing to serve as a reference in case you ever need one. Many thanks for an extraordinary and dramatic depiction of a very serious injury which clearly "catapulted" the insurance company's offer to a "full and fair" amount to settle this case."

Philip C. Coulter
Coulter &Coulter
Roanoke, VA

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