atla.doereport.comatla.doereport.comBiology: The Cell: 01: Structure - Overview of Cell Structure - Medical Animation
Biology: The Cell: 01: Structure - Overview of Cell Structure - Medical Animation



or
Search Language
Browse
Medical Illustrations
Medical Exhibits
Medical Animations
Medical Animation Titles
Medical Encyclopedia
Most Recent Uploads
Body Systems/Regions
Anatomy & Physiology
Cells & Tissues
Abdomen
Back and Spine
Foot and Ankle
Hand and Wrist
Head and Neck
Hip
Knee
Shoulder
Thorax
Medical Specialties
Anesthesiology
Cancer
Cardiology
Dentistry
Emergency Medicine
Gastroenterology
Infectious Diseases
Neurology/Neurosurgery
Nursing Home
Ob/Gyn
Orthopedics
Pathology
Pediatrics
Personal Injury
Plastic Surgery
Psychiatry
Radiology
Surgery
Urology/Nephrology
Account
Administrator Login
 
5/16/21
Biology: The Cell: 01: Structure - Overview of Cell Structure - Medical Animation
 
This animation may only be used in support of a single legal proceeding and for no other purpose. Read our License Agreement for details. To license this animation for other purposes, click here.

If animation does not play, download and install the latest free Flash Player plugin.
More Like ThisAdd To Lightbox NSV15001 Enlarge
Ready to Purchase?

$999.00

Order by phone: (800) 338-5954
Item #NSV15001Source #1136

Biology: The Cell: 01: Structure - Overview of Cell Structure - Medical Animation
MEDICAL ANIMATION TRANSCRIPT: [music] Cells are the smallest living units of an organism. All cells have three things in common, no matter what type of cell they are. All cells have a cell membrane which separates the inside of the cell from its environment. Cytoplasm, which is a jelly-like fluid, and DNA, which is the cell's genetic material. There are two broad categories of cells. The first category is eukaryotic cells. They have organelles which include the nucleus and other special parts. Eukaryotic cells are more advanced complex cells such as those found in plants and animals. The second category is prokaryotic cells. They don't have a nucleus or membrane-enclosed organelles. They do have genetic material, but it's not contained within a nucleus. Prokaryotic cells are always one-celled or unicellular organisms, such as bacteria. [music] So, what are organelles? Organelle means little organ. Organelles are the specialized parts of a cell that have unique jobs to perform. Let's start with the nucleus, the control center of the cell. The nucleus contains DNA, or genetic material. DNA dictates what the cell is going to do and how it's going to do it. Chromatin is the tangled spread out form of DNA found inside the nuclear membrane. When a cell is ready to divide, DNA condenses into structures known as chromosomes. [music] The nucleus also contains a nucleolus, which is a structure where ribosomes are made. After ribosomes leave the nucleus, they will have the important job of synthesizing, or making, proteins. [music] Outside the nucleus, the ribosomes and the rest of the organelles float around in cytoplasm, which is the jelly-like substance. Ribosomes may wander freely within the cytoplasm or attach to the endoplasmic reticulum, sometimes abbreviated as ER. There are two types of ER. Rough ER has ribosomes attached to it. And smooth ER doesn't have ribosomes attached to it. The endoplasmic reticulum is a membrane-enclosed passageway for transporting materials such as the protein synthesized by ribosomes. Proteins and other materials emerge from the endoplasmic reticulum in small vesicles where the Golgi apparatus, sometimes called the Golgi body, receives them. As proteins move through the Golgi body, they are customized into forms that the cell can use. The Golgi body does this by folding the proteins into useable shapes or adding other materials onto them such as lipids or carbohydrates. Vacuoles are sack-like structures that store different materials. Here in this plant cell, the central vacuole stores water. [music] Going back to the animal cell, you will see an organelle called a lysosome. Lysosomes are the garbage collectors that take in damaged or worn out cell parts. They are filled with enzymes that break down the cellular debris. The mitochondrion is an organelle that is the powerhouse for both animal and plant cells. During a process called cellular respiration, the mitochondria make ATP molecules that provide the energy for all of the cells activities. Cells that need more energy have more mitochondria. [music] Meanwhile, the cell maintains its shape through a cytoskeleton. The cytoskeleton includes the thread-like microfilaments which are made of protein, and microtubules which are thin, hollow tubes. Some organisms such as plants that are photoautotrophic, meaning they capture sunlight for energy, have cells with an organelle called a chloroplast. The chloroplast is where photosynthesis happens. It's green because it has a green pigment called chlorophyll. Plant cells also have a cell wall outside of their cell membranes that shape, support, and protect the plant cell. Animal cells never have a cell wall. There are many other unique structures that only some cells have. Here are just a few. In humans, for example, the respiratory tract is lined with cells that have cilia. These are microscopic, hair-like projections that can move in waves. This feature helps trap inhaled particles in the air and expels them when you cough. Another unique feature in some cells is flagella. Some bacteria have flagella. A flagellum is like a little tail that can help a cell move or propel itself. The only human cell that has a flagellum is a sperm cell. In summary, remember, eukaryotic cells are plant and animal cells with a nucleus and membrane-enclosed organelles. While prokaryotic cells are unicellular organisms without these things. All cells have a cell membrane, cytoplasm, and genetic material. And even though only plant cells have chloroplast, both plant and animal cells have mitochondria. [music]

YOU MAY ALSO WANT TO REVIEW THESE ITEMS:
Biology: Genetics: 09: DNA and RNA - Overview of DNA and RNA
Biology: Genetics: 09: DNA and RNA - Overview of DNA and RNA - NSV16034
Medical Animation
Add to my lightbox
Find More Like This
Female Skeletal Figure with Post-accident Injuries to the Neck and Shoulders Bilaterally
Female Skeletal Figure with Post-accident Injuries to the Neck and Shoulders Bilaterally - exh37206b
Medical Exhibit
Add to my lightbox
Find More Like This
Abdominal Incision
Abdominal Incision - EC00078a
Medical Illustration
Add to my lightbox
Find More Like This
Biology: The Cell: 02: Structure - Overview of Cell Boundaries
Biology: The Cell: 02: Structure - Overview of Cell Boundaries - NSV15002
Medical Animation
Add to my lightbox
Find More Like This
Biology: The Cell: 08: Cell Division - Overview of Cell Division
Biology: The Cell: 08: Cell Division - Overview of Cell Division - NSV15003
Medical Animation
Add to my lightbox
Find More Like This
Biology: The Cell: 04: Cell Transport - Overview of Cell Transport
Biology: The Cell: 04: Cell Transport - Overview of Cell Transport - NSV15007
Medical Animation
Add to my lightbox
Find More Like This
What attorneys say about MLA and The Doe Report:
"Thank you very much for the great work on the medical exhibits. Our trial resulted in a $16 million verdict for a 9 year old boy with catastrophic injuries, and the medical illustrations definitely played key role in the trial."

David Cutt
Brayton Purcell
Salt Lake City, UT

"I have a medical illustration created by Medical Legal Art at the beginning of every case to tell the client's story, usually before I depose the defendant doctor. The work product and cost-efficiency are outstanding. It is a situation where, as a trial lawyer, I don't leave home without it."

Rockne Onstad
Attorney at Law
Austin, TX

"Whether it's demonstrating a rotator cuff tear, neck movement a few milliseconds after rear impact, or a proposed lumbar fusion, the Doe Report represents an instant on-line database of medical illustration for health-care and legal professionals.

Illustrations can be purchased 'as is' or modified within hours and sent either electronically or mounted on posterboard. An illustration is worth a thousand words, as juries perk up and look intently to capture concepts that are otherwise too abstract. Start with good illustrations, a clear and direct voice, a view of the jury as 12 medical students on day one of training, and your expert testimony becomes a pleasure, even on cross examination. An experienced trial lawyer should also emphasize these illustrations at the end of trial, as a means of visually reinforcing key concepts covered.

As a treating physician, I also use these accurate illustrations to educate my own patients about their medical conditions. The Doe Report is an invaluable resource, and its authors at MLA have always been a pleasure to work with."

Richard E. Seroussi M.D., M.Sc.
Diplomate, American Boards of Electrodiagnostic Medicine and PM&R
Seattle Spine & Rehabilitation Medicine
www.seattlespine.info

"Medical Legal Art wins our firm's highest accolades for professionalism and exhibit quality. In fact, many of the doctors I work with request color copies of your outstanding artwork to show to patients during the informed consent process."

Jeanne Dolan, BSRN, AlNC
Legal Nurse Consultant
Golden Valley, MN

Medical Legal Blog |Find a Lawyer | Hospital Marketing