Quantcast
atla.doereport.comatla.doereport.comBiology: Genetics: 10: DNA Replication - Medical Animation
Biology: Genetics: 10: DNA Replication - Medical Animation



or
Search Language
Browse
Medical Illustrations
Medical Exhibits
Medical Animations
Medical Animation Titles
Medical Encyclopedia
Custom Interactive
Most Recent Uploads
Body Systems/Regions
Anatomy & Physiology
Cells & Tissues
Abdomen
Back and Spine
Foot and Ankle
Hand and Wrist
Head and Neck
Hip
Knee
Shoulder
Thorax
Medical Specialties
Anesthesiology
Cancer
Cardiology
Dentistry
Emergency Medicine
Gastroenterology
Infectious Diseases
Neurology/Neurosurgery
Nursing Home
Ob/Gyn
Orthopedics
Pathology
Pediatrics
Personal Injury
Plastic Surgery
Psychiatry
Radiology
Surgery
Urology/Nephrology
Account
Administrator Login
 
5/28/20
Biology: Genetics: 10: DNA Replication - Medical Animation
 
This animation may only be used in support of a single legal proceeding and for no other purpose. Read our License Agreement for details. To license this animation for other purposes, click here.

If animation does not play, download and install the latest free Flash Player plugin.
More Like ThisAdd To Lightbox NSV16037 Enlarge Share
Ready to Purchase?

$999.00

Order by phone: (800) 338-5954
Item #NSV16037Source #1136

Biology: Genetics: 10: DNA Replication - Medical Animation
MEDICAL ANIMATION TRANSCRIPT:
Let's take a look at DNA replication, the process in which DNA copies itself. Why does DNA need to copy itself? Well, before a cell divides during mitosis, it must make a copy of its original DNA. This ensures that both resulting daughter cells will have DNA that is identical to the original cell's DNA. So at what point in the cell cycle does DNA replication happen? DNA is copied or replicated during the S phase of the cell cycle. A good way to remember this is that S stands for synthesis, which means to make. Now, let's see how DNA replicates during the S phase. If we zoom into the nucleus, we can see the DNA molecules two strands or sides twisted together in the classic double-helix formation. The two strands are connected by hydrogen bonds between their nitrogenous bases. The first step of replication begins with an enzyme called DNA helicase. The suffix A-S-E or ASE tells you right away that helicase is an enzyme. Helicase unwinds and then separates the two sides of the DNA molecule by breaking the hydrogen bonds between their nitrogenous bases. Each separate half of the DNA can now serve as a template or pattern for the creation of a new strand of DNA. This separation exposes all of the nitrogenous bases on both sides of the DNA to the environment within the nucleus where free nucleotides are present. This brings us to the second step in DNA replication, the creation of two new identical DNA strands. An enzyme that assists in this process is called DNA polymerase. It adds free nucleotides available in the nucleus to the original template strands. DNA polymerase does this by creating new hydrogen bonds between the available nitrogenous bases of the free nucleotides and those on both sides of the original DNA molecule. New nucleotides are added to the template strands following the base pair rule of nitrogenous bases. Remember, in DNA, adenine always bonds with thymine. Thymine always bonds with adenine. Guanine always bonds with cytosine, and cytosine always bonds with guanine. So these newly attached nucleotides form a mirror image or complementary strand on each template strand of the original DNA. As a result of this replication process, two duplicate molecules of DNA are produced from the original DNA molecule. With DNA replication now completed, the cell is ready to begin mitosis. We will cover mitosis in another video. In summary, DNA replication is a process in which DNA duplicates itself, making an identical copy. Replication occurs during the S phase of the cell cycle when a somatic cell is preparing to divide. DNA replication is necessary so that the two daughter cells produced after mitosis both have DNA that is identical to each other and identical to the DNA in the original cell. At the beginning of replication, an enzyme called DNA helicase breaks the hydrogen bonds between nitrogenous bases and unwinds the DNA molecule. Each side of the original DNA molecule serves as a template for the creation of a new complementary strand of DNA. With the assistance of DNA polymerase and other enzymes, free nucleotides are added to the template strands following the base pair rule. The result of DNA replication is two identical duplicate DNA molecules from the original DNA molecule. ♪ [music] ♪

YOU MAY ALSO WANT TO REVIEW THESE ITEMS:
C5-6 and C6-7 Disc Herniations with Spinal Cord Impingement
C5-6 and C6-7 Disc Herniations with Spinal Cord Impingement - exh4912
Medical Exhibit
Add to my lightbox
Find More Like This
Anterior Disc Fusion
Anterior Disc Fusion - EJ00008
Medical Illustration
Add to my lightbox
Find More Like This
Progression from Healing Rib Fracture to Healed Rib after Conservative Treatment
Progression from Healing Rib Fracture to Healed Rib after Conservative Treatment - exh46060b
Medical Exhibit
Add to my lightbox
Find More Like This
Helicase Enzyme
Helicase Enzyme - ANS00056
Medical Animation
Add to my lightbox
Find More Like This
Lumbar Burst Fracture
Lumbar Burst Fracture - exh60438b
Medical Exhibit
Add to my lightbox
Find More Like This
Traumatic Shoulder and Ankle Injuries
Traumatic Shoulder and Ankle Injuries - exh70140
Medical Exhibit
Add to my lightbox
Find More Like This
What attorneys say about MLA and The Doe Report:
"Thanks, and your illustrations were effective in a $3 million dollar verdict last Friday."

Joseph M. Prodor
Trial Lawyer
White Rock, British Columbia
"[Your staff] was extremely efficient, cooperative and gracious and [their] efforts produced a demonstrative exhibit that we used effectively throughout our trial. The jury verdict of $3,165,000.00 was, in no small measure, due to the impact of the demonstrative evidence. You may be sure that we will call again."

David J. Dean
Sullivan Papain Block McGrath & Cannavo, P.C.
New York, NY

"I wanted to thank you for the terrific job you did illustrating my client's injuries. The case was settled at the pre-suit mediation, and I believe a good part of the success we had was due to the medical legal art you prepared.

Your work received the ultimate compliment at the conclusion of the mediation. The hospital risk manager took the exhibit with them at the conclusion of mediation, and will be using it to train nurses on how to prevent bed sores..."

Steven G. Koeppel
Troy, Yeslow & Koeppel, P.A.
Fort Myers, FL

"Thank you for the wonderful illustrations. The case resulted in a defense verdict last Friday. I know [our medical expert witness] presented some challenges for you and I appreciate how you were able to work with him."

Robert F. Donnelly
Goodman Allen & Filetti, PLLC
Richmond, VA

Medical Legal Blog |Find a Lawyer | Hospital Marketing